stephen greenblatt

Showing 17 posts tagged stephen greenblatt

I have always loved to write, that is, to pay attention to the fact that I am doing something more than amassing scholarly information. And I have always despised the monkish obscurity cultivated by certain academics. The first sentence of my doctoral dissertation was ‘Sir Henry Yelverton was no friend to Sir Walter Ralegh.’ I liked it precisely because you could not tell if you were beginning a novel or a history or—as it happened—a Ph.D. thesis.

from How I Write: Stephen Greenblatt, Pulitzer Winner of ‘The Swerve’

"A nonfiction wonder…part adventure tale, part enthralling history of ideas." —Maureen Corrigan, NPR

✓ Pulitzer Prize Winner

✓ National Book Award Winner

Time Magazine #1 Best Non-Fiction Book

✓ Starred Reviews from Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, and Kirkus Reviews

✓ New York Times Notable Book

✓ New York Times Hardcover Non-Fiction Bestseller

✓ And now…New York Times Paperback Non-Fiction Bestseller

The Swerve by Stephen Greenblatt is now available in paperback.

On the fiftieth anniversary of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, the New York Times interviewed M. H. Abrams (the founding general editor) and Stephen Greenblatt (the current general editor).
New York Times: For a prospective undergraduate reading this Q. and A., how would you answer the question, Why study literature?
Abrams: Ha — Why live? Life without literature is a life reduced to penury. It expands you in every way. It illuminates what you’re doing. It shows you possibilities you haven’t thought of. It enables you to live the lives of other people than yourself. It broadens you, it makes you more human. It makes life enjoyable. There’s no end to the response you can make to that question, but Stephen has a few things to add. 
Greenblatt: Literature is the most astonishing technological means that humans have created, and now practiced for thousands of years, to capture experience. For me the thrill of literature involved entering into the life worlds of others. I’m from a particular, constricted place in time, and I suddenly am part of a huge world — other times, other places, other inner lives that I otherwise would have no access to.
Read the full interview. Follow @NortonAnthology on Twitter.

On the fiftieth anniversary of the Norton Anthology of English Literature, the New York Times interviewed M. H. Abrams (the founding general editor) and Stephen Greenblatt (the current general editor).

New York Times: For a prospective undergraduate reading this Q. and A., how would you answer the question, Why study literature?

Abrams: Ha — Why live? Life without literature is a life reduced to penury. It expands you in every way. It illuminates what you’re doing. It shows you possibilities you haven’t thought of. It enables you to live the lives of other people than yourself. It broadens you, it makes you more human. It makes life enjoyable. There’s no end to the response you can make to that question, but Stephen has a few things to add. 

Greenblatt: Literature is the most astonishing technological means that humans have created, and now practiced for thousands of years, to capture experience. For me the thrill of literature involved entering into the life worlds of others. I’m from a particular, constricted place in time, and I suddenly am part of a huge world — other times, other places, other inner lives that I otherwise would have no access to.

Read the full interview. Follow @NortonAnthology on Twitter.

The Norton Anthology: Built to Last

Stephen Greenblatt: The anthology changes, but it is meant to last. Even now in its somewhat bulky form, people keep their Norton Anthology for their whole lives. And they do that for a reason. They do it because they sense that it’s not something that just comes and goes. They trust it and want to return to it. That’s something again that our culture has too little of and that the anthology has passionately served.

M. H. Abrams: One of the pleasures of being an editor of the anthology is to meet middle-aged people who say: “I still have the Norton Anthology that I used 20 years ago. I have it at my bed’s head, and I read it at night, and I enjoy it.” It’s a pleasure that you don’t outgrow the anthology. It’s oriented toward undergraduates, but it’s used by graduate students in preparing for their oral examinations. It continues to be read by people who were introduced to it 20, 25, 30 years ago in their classes. That’s a great joy for an editor.

—From a conversation between M. H. Abrams and Stephen Greenblatt in the New York Times Book Review

We can’t help but wonder if the recent window display at the Bulgari store at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York was inspired by the winner of this year’s Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award, The Swerve.
Both the book and the store display feature a detail from Primavera by Sandro Botticelli. The woman in the painting is Flora, goddess of Spring. The blog Tinsel Creation goes into much more detail. High-res

We can’t help but wonder if the recent window display at the Bulgari store at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York was inspired by the winner of this year’s Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award, The Swerve.

Both the book and the store display feature a detail from Primavera by Sandro Botticelli. The woman in the painting is Flora, goddess of Spring. The blog Tinsel Creation goes into much more detail.

nationalbook:

Before he won the National Book Award in 2011 for The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, Stephen Greenblatt was an NBA Finalist in 2004 for Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare. Watch Greenblatt read from The Swerve and accept his National Book Award here.

Stephen Greenblatt. Automatic re-blog.

And finally, a nod to Lucretius. His ‘On the Nature of Things’ is the quintessential book that lives, the Norton ideal.

From Norton President W. Drake McFeely’s note to the staff on THE SWERVE winning the National Book Award in non-fiction.