New Yorker

Showing 10 posts tagged New Yorker

E. M. Forster’s afterword to Maurice, the novel he wrote in 1914 but was not published until after his death in 1971:
A happy ending was imperative. I shouldn’t have bothered to write otherwise. I was determined that in fiction anyway two men should fall in love and remain in it for the ever and ever that fiction allows, and in this sense Maurice and Alec still roam the greenwood. I dedicated it ‘To a Happier Year’ and not altogether vainly. Happiness is its keynote.
Read “To A Happier Year,” Peter Fulham’s New Yorker essay about how this week’s Supreme Court decisions are “an answer to the hopeful plea from another era: ‘Don’t give up.’”

E. M. Forster’s afterword to Maurice, the novel he wrote in 1914 but was not published until after his death in 1971:

A happy ending was imperative. I shouldn’t have bothered to write otherwise. I was determined that in fiction anyway two men should fall in love and remain in it for the ever and ever that fiction allows, and in this sense Maurice and Alec still roam the greenwood. I dedicated it ‘To a Happier Year’ and not altogether vainly. Happiness is its keynote.

Read “To A Happier Year,” Peter Fulham’s New Yorker essay about how this week’s Supreme Court decisions are “an answer to the hopeful plea from another era: ‘Don’t give up.’”

If I Were Built, I’d Be a Poet

If I were built, I’d be a poet. I’d be the strongest poet who ever lived. It wouldn’t come easy, though. I know this. It would require years of literary study and weight training, introspection and nutritional discipline, derangement of the senses and protein cocktails. For many years I’d toil in obscurity, one word, one shirt size at a time. I’d sign up for kettle bell classes. I’d send my poems to university literary journals. I’d sprint up and down sand dunes in the dead of night, the “Norton Anthology of English Literature,” Volumes One and Two, strapped to my calves—and during breaks I’d read Coleridge by moonlight. Nothing comes easy in the poetry or body-building worlds. No one would pay me to be an aspiring poet-strongman.

—Keep reading Andrew Palmer and Brian Platzer’s Shouts and Murmurs piece in the New Yorker.

And if you want to get built, you can strap these to your calves. Or read them.

Last week we announced the Pug-lication Party to celebrate the publication of After the Fall by New Yorker cartoonist Victoria Roberts. Our call for pug pics was heard far and wide and the internet’s proud pug owners made themselves known. After reviewing hundreds of wonderful photos, we picked five of our favorites to be drawn by Victoria.

OUR FIFTH (AND FINAL) WINNER

Submitted by Seren8 via Tumblr.

ABOUT VICTORIA ROBERTS AND AFTER THE FALL

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. Last week, Norton published her charmingly illustrated debut novel After the Fall.

"This is a wonderful, forever book." —George Booth, cartoonist for The New Yorker

Last week we announced the Pug-lication Party to celebrate the publication of After the Fall by New Yorker cartoonist Victoria Roberts. Our call for pug pics was heard far and wide and the internet’s proud pug owners made themselves known. After reviewing hundreds of wonderful photos, we picked five of our favorites to be drawn by Victoria.

OUR FOURTH WINNER

Meet the sled pugs: Gracie and Chloe. Siberian huskies have the whole sledding business backwards. This photo was submitted by Kate via Tumblr.

ABOUT VICTORIA ROBERTS AND AFTER THE FALL

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. Last week, Norton published her charmingly illustrated debut novel After the Fall.

After the Fall is Gatsby-meets-Edward Gorey with Eloise firmly in tow.” —David Small, author of Stitches

Last week we announced the Pug-lication Party to celebrate the publication of After the Fall by New Yorker cartoonist Victoria Roberts. Our call for pug pics was heard far and wide and the internet’s proud pug owners made themselves known. After reviewing hundreds of wonderful photos, we picked five of our favorites to be drawn by Victoria.

OUR THIRD WINNER

Meet Professor Penelope Glottis. Penelope’s photo was submitted by @linuxlibrarian via Twitter.

ABOUT VICTORIA ROBERTS AND AFTER THE FALL

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. Last week, Norton published her charmingly illustrated debut novel After the Fall.

After the Fall is written and illustrated with all the wit and irrepressible glee that makes her New Yorker cartoons such a treat.”
—Kevin Baker, author of Strivers Row

Last week we announced the Pug-lication Party to celebrate the publication of After the Fall by New Yorker cartoonist Victoria Roberts. Our call for pug pics was heard far and wide and the internet’s proud pug owners made themselves known. After reviewing hundreds of wonderful photos, we picked five of our favorites to be drawn by Victoria.

OUR SECOND WINNER

Meet Good Ester, the one-eyed wonder dog. Ester’s photo was submitted by Carolina (@cmonstah on Twitter). Considering how there is nothing that Ester can’t do, Victoria drew her playing the violin.

ABOUT VICTORIA ROBERTS AND AFTER THE FALL

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. Last week, Norton published her charmingly illustrated debut novel After the Fall.

After the Fall belongs in the same category as E. B. White’s Stuart Little.”
—Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, founding president of the Central Park Conservancy

Last week we announced the Pug-lication Party to celebrate the publication of After the Fall by New Yorker cartoonist Victoria Roberts. Our call for pug pics was heard far and wide and the internet’s proud pug owners made themselves known. After reviewing hundreds of wonderful photos, we picked five of our favorites to be drawn by Victoria.

OUR FIRST WINNER

Meet Mila. Mila’s photo was submitted by Rob via Tumblr.

ABOUT VICTORIA ROBERTS AND AFTER THE FALL

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. Last week, Norton published her charmingly illustrated debut novel After the Fall.

"With her distinctive, intelligent drawings and tongue-in-cheek humor, legendary cartoonist Victoria Roberts has crafted a delightfully quirky coming-of-age fantasy for adults."
—Patricia Bosworth, author of Diane Arbus: A Biography

PUG-LICATION PARTY! SUBMIT YOUR PUG PIC FOR A CHANCE TO HAVE IT DRAWN BY NEW YORKER CARTOONIST AND PUG ENTHUSIAST VICTORIA ROBERTS

Victoria Roberts has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker since 1988. Today, Norton publishes her charmingly illustrated debut novel After the Fall. It introduces a brilliantly eccentric family from New York’s Upper East Side, but when the family’s patriarch—a mad inventor and self-made millionaire—goes bust, the family finds themselves living in Central Park. It’s more comfortable than you’d expect with the aid of their two loyal housekeepers and the maitre d’ from their favorite restaurant. But when the strains of the new living arrangements threaten to tear the family apart, it’s up to the children (Alan and Sis) and their ever-present pugs (Olive, Phoebe, and Sancho) to bring the family back together.

WHAT IS A PUG-LICATION PARTY?

The three pugs in Victoria Roberts’s New York story are the unsung heroes of her tale. To celebrate the publication of After the Fall and the dogs you can’t help but love, Victoria Roberts (a New Yorker cartoonist, let’s not forget) will lovingly illustrate your pug. We’ll pick five submitted photos and post one a day along with Victoria’s illustration next week and then mail Victoria’s drawings to the owners of the five now internet-famous pugs.

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR PUG PIC:

There are three ways to submit your pug photo: 1) share it with @wwnorton on Twitter with the hashtag: #puglication, 2) share the photo with us via Tumblr here by choosing “submit a photo” from the drop-down list at the top, or, 3) just photo reply to this post. Easy! The deadline for submissions is Thursday, November 15th at 5pm ET. We’ll begin posting the results on Monday, November 19th.

UPDATE: After an adorable deluge of pug pics we are no longer accepting submissions. Thanks for everyone who shared their pugs with us. Stay tuned!

UPDATE 2: The winners!

GRIMM TALES FOR ADULTS

In the recent New Yorker article on the lure of the fairy tale,Joan Acocella discusses the virtues of Maria Tatar’s Annotated Brothers Grimm:

"Her edition is the one I would recommend. The book is dazzlingly illustrated…another virtue of Tatar’s edition is that she has isolated, at the end, a group of ‘Tales for Adults’—stories that she feels should be examined by parents before they are read to children. Included in this section is ‘The Stubborn Child,’ together with such items as ‘The Hand with the Knife’ and ‘The Jew in the Brambles.’ Still, 'The Juniper Tree,' which Tatar herself describes as 'probably the most shocking of all fairy tales,' is not placed among the ‘Tales for Adults,’ presumably because it is too characteristic, to echt Grimm, to be cordoned off in a special section. (Parents should simply not read it to children. If they give the child the book, they should get an X-Acto knife and slice the story out first.)

Always excited to celebrate a major anniversary, Norton will be publishing a new, expanded bicentennial edition of the Annotated Brothers Grimm in October.