Diana Athill

Showing 4 posts tagged Diana Athill

To our American ears, the variety of accents in Britain is endlessly fascinating. [Diana Athill’s] is one of those that evokes country houses, horsemanship and the ruling class.

In the San Francisco Chronicle, Martin Rubin describes the tone of Diana Athill’s charming letters to the American poet Edward Field in her new book Letters to a Friend. Rubin goes on to say that Athill’s letters bring to mind Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and Prejudice.
FIRST LINES FROM NEW BOOKS OUT TODAY: APRIL 16, 2012
"Dear Mr. Field, Alfred’s letters arrived yesterday when, as it happened, I was spending a day at home so I was able to read them straight away; then lie awake most of the night thinking about him. What an old cat among the pigeons of my quiet mind!"Letters to a Friend by Diana Athill
"On July 18, 1936, on hearing of the military uprising in Morocco, an aristocratic landowner lined up the laborers on his estate to the southwest of Salamanca and shot six of them as a lesson to the others."The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition and Extermination in Twentieth-Century Spain by Paul Preston
"In 1918, when young Hemingway passed through New York on his way to the Great War, no one took notice."Hemingway: The 1930s Through the Final Years by Michael S. Reynolds
"Rebecca Navarro sat in her spacious conservatory and looked out across the bright, fresh garden. Perky was down at the bottom end by the old stone wall, pruning the rose-bushes."Ecstasy: Three Tales of Chemical Romance by Irvine Welsh
"Bob and I fell in love, first with each other, and then with France. In both cases it was love at first sight—but there was quite a long time between the sightings."Paris to the Past: Traveling Through French History by Train by Ina Caro High-res

FIRST LINES FROM NEW BOOKS OUT TODAY: APRIL 16, 2012

"Dear Mr. Field, Alfred’s letters arrived yesterday when, as it happened, I was spending a day at home so I was able to read them straight away; then lie awake most of the night thinking about him. What an old cat among the pigeons of my quiet mind!"
Letters to a Friend by Diana Athill

"On July 18, 1936, on hearing of the military uprising in Morocco, an aristocratic landowner lined up the laborers on his estate to the southwest of Salamanca and shot six of them as a lesson to the others."
The Spanish Holocaust: Inquisition and Extermination in Twentieth-Century Spain by Paul Preston

"In 1918, when young Hemingway passed through New York on his way to the Great War, no one took notice."
Hemingway: The 1930s Through the Final Years by Michael S. Reynolds

"Rebecca Navarro sat in her spacious conservatory and looked out across the bright, fresh garden. Perky was down at the bottom end by the old stone wall, pruning the rose-bushes."
Ecstasy: Three Tales of Chemical Romance by Irvine Welsh

"Bob and I fell in love, first with each other, and then with France. In both cases it was love at first sight—but there was quite a long time between the sightings."
Paris to the Past: Traveling Through French History by Train by Ina Caro

"Later on in her life, [Diana] Athill was herself the mistress of a married man on a    number of occasions – she’s often written about how she had few, if any,    moral qualms about her role. ‘I think being “the other woman” suited me down    to the ground,’ she says now. ‘In fact, I think it was what I was best at.” -The Telegraph
(Photo by Joss McKinley) High-res

"Later on in her life, [Diana] Athill was herself the mistress of a married man on a number of occasions – she’s often written about how she had few, if any, moral qualms about her role. ‘I think being “the other woman” suited me down to the ground,’ she says now. ‘In fact, I think it was what I was best at.” -The Telegraph

(Photo by Joss McKinley)

Diana Athill is still a rebel at 93

Athill will argue that there are two kinds of physical betrayal: the “awful” kind that marks a breakdown in a relationship, and the second kind, an unfaithful act that takes place when someone, “usually the man”, succumbs to a little temptation.

"To mistake the second betrayal for the first is madness, because a marriage is far more important than that," she says.