On this day in 1929:

“We very much like your title The Secret of the Old Clock,” wrote L. F. Reed of Grosset & Dunlap to Edward Stratemeyer about his latest idea for a girl detective series. However, Reed didn’t like most of the names Stratemeyer suggested for his teen heroine: “Stella Strong,” “Nell Cody,” and “Diana Dare.” He preferred “Nancy Drew.” Stratemeyer already had a thirty-year track record of creating series like the Rover Boys, Tom Swift, and, most recently, the Hardy Boys, so he confidently put the new sleuth in the hands of a young journalist named Mildred Wirt, and beginning with The Secret of the Old Clock, Wirt wrote nearly all of the first twenty-five Nancy Drew books published under the pen name of Carolyn Keene.

That’s just one entry from Tom Nissley’s A Reader’s Book of Days, a day-by-day companion to the literary year—this one accompanied by one of the book’s many charming illustrations by Joanna Neborsky. Enter to win a copy on Goodreads. High-res

On this day in 1929:

“We very much like your title The Secret of the Old Clock,” wrote L. F. Reed of Grosset & Dunlap to Edward Stratemeyer about his latest idea for a girl detective series. However, Reed didn’t like most of the names Stratemeyer suggested for his teen heroine: “Stella Strong,” “Nell Cody,” and “Diana Dare.” He preferred “Nancy Drew.” Stratemeyer already had a thirty-year track record of creating series like the Rover Boys, Tom Swift, and, most recently, the Hardy Boys, so he confidently put the new sleuth in the hands of a young journalist named Mildred Wirt, and beginning with The Secret of the Old Clock, Wirt wrote nearly all of the first twenty-five Nancy Drew books published under the pen name of Carolyn Keene.

That’s just one entry from Tom Nissley’s A Reader’s Book of Days, a day-by-day companion to the literary year—this one accompanied by one of the book’s many charming illustrations by Joanna Neborsky. Enter to win a copy on Goodreads.