"We are the advance guard of a massive moral revolution for jobs and freedom" —A. Philip Randolph, August, 28, 1963
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered the finale at the Lincoln Memorial, but the tone for the day was set in an opening address by A. Philip Randolph, the seventy-four-year-old trade unionist who was the official leader of the March on Washington. Randolph agreed with King on the need for integration and racial equality in the South, but he linked those objectives to a broader national and interracial struggle for economic and social justice.
Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech. As William P. Jones reveals in his “magnificent work of historical reconstruction” (Michael Honey), The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights, there was far more to the day than we usually remember. Read an excerpt from The March on Washington on the legacy of August 28th, 1963 on Medium.

"We are the advance guard of a massive moral revolution for jobs and freedom" —A. Philip Randolph, August, 28, 1963

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered the finale at the Lincoln Memorial, but the tone for the day was set in an opening address by A. Philip Randolph, the seventy-four-year-old trade unionist who was the official leader of the March on Washington. Randolph agreed with King on the need for integration and racial equality in the South, but he linked those objectives to a broader national and interracial struggle for economic and social justice.

Today marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, where Dr. King delivered his famous “I have a dream” speech. As William P. Jones reveals in his “magnificent work of historical reconstruction” (Michael Honey), The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights, there was far more to the day than we usually remember. Read an excerpt from The March on Washington on the legacy of August 28th, 1963 on Medium.