FIRST LINES FROM NEW BOOKS OUT TODAY: OCTOBER 1, 2012
"No dog chained to a spike in a yard of dyinggrass like the dogsI grew up with, starving, overfed, punched in the faceby children, no children, no firecrackersslipped down the long throats of bottles in the first days of summer.”Mayakovsky’s Revolver: Poems by Matthew Dickman
"The virus now known as Hendra wasn’t the first of the scary new bugs. It wasn’t the worst. Compared to some others, it seems relatively minor. Its mortal impact, in numerical terms, was small at the start and has remained small; its geographical scope was narrowly local and later episodes haven’t carried it much more widely. It made its debut near Brisbane, Australia in 1994."Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen
"The world is in transition from an era of food abundance to one of scarcity. Over the last decade, world grain reserves have fallen by one third. World food prices have more than doubled, triggering a worldwide land rush and ushering in a new geopolitics of food. Food is the new oil. Land is the new gold."Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity by Lester R. Brown
"On March 18, 1968, three months before an assassin’s bullet cut short his life, Senator Robert F. Kennedy made an impassioned speech at the University of Kansas. He spoke about the health of his nation, the economic powerhouse that is the United States of America, and the way we measure national wealth using figures such as the Gross National Product."Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Created Modern Finance by Jane Gleeson-White
"When I came to the United States, I gave up one citizenship and gained two. As I became an American, I began to discover that I was also a Latin American. In one way or another, all of us Spanish-speaking Latin Americans living in the United States are refugees, but with deep New World roots. Forced together by our needs, we live in the same neighborhoods, shop in the same markets, and work in the same factories, offices, and restaurant kitchens. We can’t help learning from each other."Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America by Maricel E. Presilla

FIRST LINES FROM NEW BOOKS OUT TODAY: OCTOBER 1, 2012

"No dog chained to a spike in a yard of dying
grass like the dogs
I grew up with, starving, overfed, punched in the face
by children, no children, no firecrackers
slipped down the long throats of bottles in the first days of summer.”
Mayakovsky’s Revolver: Poems by Matthew Dickman

"The virus now known as Hendra wasn’t the first of the scary new bugs. It wasn’t the worst. Compared to some others, it seems relatively minor. Its mortal impact, in numerical terms, was small at the start and has remained small; its geographical scope was narrowly local and later episodes haven’t carried it much more widely. It made its debut near Brisbane, Australia in 1994."
Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

"The world is in transition from an era of food abundance to one of scarcity. Over the last decade, world grain reserves have fallen by one third. World food prices have more than doubled, triggering a worldwide land rush and ushering in a new geopolitics of food. Food is the new oil. Land is the new gold."
Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity by Lester R. Brown

"On March 18, 1968, three months before an assassin’s bullet cut short his life, Senator Robert F. Kennedy made an impassioned speech at the University of Kansas. He spoke about the health of his nation, the economic powerhouse that is the United States of America, and the way we measure national wealth using figures such as the Gross National Product."
Double Entry: How the Merchants of Venice Created Modern Finance by Jane Gleeson-White

"When I came to the United States, I gave up one citizenship and gained two. As I became an American, I began to discover that I was also a Latin American. In one way or another, all of us Spanish-speaking Latin Americans living in the United States are refugees, but with deep New World roots. Forced together by our needs, we live in the same neighborhoods, shop in the same markets, and work in the same factories, offices, and restaurant kitchens. We can’t help learning from each other."
Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America by Maricel E. Presilla