quiteinterestingfacts:

The black mamba is not black; it gets its name from the color of the inside of its mouth.

The creators of the hugely popular BBC quiz show QI are back with a brilliant sequel to their New York Times–bestselling 1,227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off.
Follow quiteinterestingfacts for mind-boggling trivia morsels straight from their new book: 1,339 Quite Interesting Facts to Make Your Jaw Drop. Informative, hilarious, sometimes arcane or utterly useless, but always entertaining and in stores now!  High-res

quiteinterestingfacts:

The black mamba is not black; it gets its name from the color of the inside of its mouth.

The creators of the hugely popular BBC quiz show QI are back with a brilliant sequel to their New York Times–bestselling 1,227 Quite Interesting Facts to Blow Your Socks Off.

Follow quiteinterestingfacts for mind-boggling trivia morsels straight from their new book: 1,339 Quite Interesting Facts to Make Your Jaw Drop. Informative, hilarious, sometimes arcane or utterly useless, but always entertaining and in stores now! 

storyofpop:

The Dave Clark Five were blindingly primitive, powered by Clark’s anti-jazz drums, relentless two-note saxophone, and Mike Smith’s raw bellowed vocals. After a few false starts, “Glad All Over” took them to number one, knocking the Beatles’ “I Want to Hold Your Hand” off the top (“Has the Five Jive Crushed the Beatles’ Beat?” asked the papers) at the start of ’64. It was loud, hard, fast, and all about a relentless thump.

From Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé by Bob Stanley, out now in hardcover and ebook.

"Has the Five Jive Crushed the Beatles Beat?" You tell us.

storyofpop:

If you had to explain the Beatles’ impact to a stranger, you’d play them the soundtrack to A Hard Day’s Night. The songs, conceived in a hotel room in a spare couple of weeks between up-ending the British class system and conquering America, were full of bite and speed. There was adventure, knowingness, love, and abundant charm.

Every stage of the Beatles’ career had a complementary drug: speed (their Hamburg and Merseybeat period), cannabis (the sleepy Rubber Soul), acid (Revolver and Sgt. Pepper) and heroin (Lennon’s crack-up on The White Album). With A Hard Day’s Night, the drug was adrenaline. The world loved them, and the world was their plaything.

From Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé by Bob Stanley, out now in hardcover and ebook.

Beatlemania hits storyofpop.

"Our relationship with nature has changed…radically, irreversibly, but by no means all for the bad. Our new epoch is laced with invention. Our mistakes are legion, but our talent is immeasurable." —Diane Ackerman, from The Human Age

Diane Ackerman’s new book, The Human Age, goes on sale September 10th. That evening Ackerman will be joined by Dava Sobel at the 92y for a conversation on our responsibilities as the dominant force shaping the future of planet earth.

Get tickets now.

No menu will ever be the same. In his new book The Language of Food, Dan Jurafsky, a MacArthur fellow and professor of linguistics and computer science at Stanford, peels away the mysteries from the foods we think we know. 

The Atlantic just highlighted Jurafsky’s findings after analyzing 6,500 restaurant menus. After you discover the linguistic divide between Per Se and Pizza Hut, enter to win The Language of Food on Goodreads.

Track

There Goes My Baby

Artist

The Drifters

Album

Up On The Roof: The Best Of The Drifters

storyofpop:

Modern pop is essentially urban, and city living is a matter of constant shifting of context, between neighborhoods and between roles. Two or more seemingly incompatible styles working at once is the existential reality of urban life. The term “authenticity,” one which causes a constant tension throughout the story of modern pop, was popularized by existentialism, the du jour beatnik/student philosophy of the early sixties. Beatniks, jazz fans, and readers of Kierkegaard and Sartre may have heard “There Goes My Baby” by the Drifters (1959) in the context of a TV show like Dick Clark’s American Bandstand and dismissed it as inauthentic, emotionally infantile, but right here was a blend of different musics and neighborhoods (Spanish Harlem, Long Island, the Bronx, Broadway) that related to shape-shifting street life much more closely than the venerated, undiluted directness of Pete Seeger’s folk or Chris Barber’s jazz. 

From Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Story of Pop Music from Bill Haley to Beyoncé by Bob Stanley, out now in hardcover and ebook.

This is a classic Stanley nugget: incisive, provocative, and spot-on.