The World to Come by Dara Horn - Get the eBook for just $1.99!

"Nothing short of amazing." —Entertainment Weekly

A million-dollar painting by Marc Chagall is stolen from a museum. The unlikely thief is Benjamin Ziskind, a thirty-year-old quiz-show writer. As Benjamin and his twin sister try to evade the police, they find themselves recalling their dead parents—the father who lost a leg in Vietnam, the mother who created children’s books—and their stories about trust, loss, and betrayal.

nprfreshair:

Mary Roach's latest book Gulp takes a tour of the human digestive system—including flatulence. In the interview she explains some of the scientific research on toots:

"The man who’s done the most work on flatus — and I counted 34 papers on flatus — Michael Levitt at the VA Medical Center in Minneapolis, he was testing a number of products that allegedly remedied noxious flatus — that noxious smell. He was testing pads you can put in your underwear. There’s elasticized underwear; there are pills you can take; there is actually a remedy — there’s something called Devrom, which is an internal deodorant. … However, I spoke to one gastroenterologist [and] I asked him about this and he said, ‘You know, when I get someone who comes in and is complaining about noxious flatus, I tell them: Just get a dog.’ In other words, so you can blame the dog."

Gulp comes out in paperback in April.
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nprfreshair:

Mary Roach's latest book Gulp takes a tour of the human digestive system—including flatulence. In the interview she explains some of the scientific research on toots:

"The man who’s done the most work on flatus — and I counted 34 papers on flatus — Michael Levitt at the VA Medical Center in Minneapolis, he was testing a number of products that allegedly remedied noxious flatus — that noxious smell. He was testing pads you can put in your underwear. There’s elasticized underwear; there are pills you can take; there is actually a remedy — there’s something called Devrom, which is an internal deodorant. … However, I spoke to one gastroenterologist [and] I asked him about this and he said, ‘You know, when I get someone who comes in and is complaining about noxious flatus, I tell them: Just get a dog.’ In other words, so you can blame the dog."

Gulp comes out in paperback in April.

BLAKE BAILEY — ON TOUR FOR THE SPLENDID THINGS WE PLANNED

"A sleek, dramatic, authentically lurid story fueled by a candid fraternal rivalry."—Janet Maslin, New York Times

3/4 — Washington DCPolitics & Prose, with Elliott Holt
3/6 — New York CityMcNally Jackson, with Darin Strauss
3/12 — Oklahoma CityFull Circle Books
3/14 — TulsaBook Smart, Circle Cinema
3/22 — New Orleans — Tennessee Williams Festival: “Whose Life Is It Anyway?" with Thomas Beller, Rich Cohen, and Nigel Hamilton
5/22 — SeattleHugo House, with Tom Nissley

On Thermonuclear Monarchy: An Interview with Elaine Scarry

Now, sometimes, you do have executives willing to say, “Look, we can’t do things constitutionally because I have a lot of power here.” There’s the amazing moment when Dick Cheney said—and I cite this in the book—on a television program, in response to questions about torture in the Bush administration and Guantanamo, instead of saying, “You’re over-estimating executive power,” says, “You guys are not thinking clearly. What we did is nothing compared to the power the president has. Day and night, he’s being followed around with a nuclear briefcase. Don’t deceive yourself. His power is far beyond what you imagine.”

We seldom have people talking so candidly, and when they do, we think, “Oh that’s just a bizarre stylistic feature of Dick Cheney.” That’s not a bizarre feature; that’s a candid statement of fact.

Read the (terrifying) American Reader interview with Elaine Scarry. Her book Thermonuclear Monarchy: Choosing Between Democracy and Doom is in stores now.